Browse Articles

  • News & Views |

    Organic carbon in the top metre of Earth’s soils is far older than previously thought, averaging 4,800 years old. These radiocarbon-derived age estimates require us to recalibrate our expectations of ecosystem gains and losses of carbon.

    • Sharon A. Billings
    •  & Lígia F. T. de Souza
  • Article |

    Fast settling rates of suspended silt and clay particles suggest that mud in rivers is largely flocculated and part of suspended bed-material load.

    • Michael P. Lamb
    • , Jan de Leeuw
    • , Woodward W. Fischer
    • , Andrew J. Moodie
    • , Jeremy G. Venditti
    • , Jeffrey A. Nittrouer
    • , Daniel Haught
    •  & Gary Parker
  • Editorial |

    Nature Geoscience aims to publish important science, but the journal also strives to offer a platform to voices driving change within the geoscience community. We welcome submissions on community issues that encourage reader engagement and inspire action.

  • Article |

    Soils may accumulate less carbon and with a slower turnover than Earth system models predict, according to analysis of the age distribution of global soil carbon, which finds that the mean age of soil carbon is older than that in simulated in models.

    • Zheng Shi
    • , Steven D. Allison
    • , Yujie He
    • , Paul A. Levine
    • , Alison M. Hoyt
    • , Jeffrey Beem-Miller
    • , Qing Zhu
    • , William R. Wieder
    • , Susan Trumbore
    •  & James T. Randerson
  • News & Views |

    Compositional signatures of subducted crust in the deep-mantle sources of ocean island volcanoes in the Atlantic Ocean but not the Pacific reveal that plate motions on Earth’s surface influence the characteristics of Earth’s deepest interior.

    • Richard W. Carlson
  • Article |

    Interactions between magma and water can drive explosive fragmentation eruptions of the type seen in the Havre volcanic eruption, New Zealand, in 2012, even under submarine conditions, according to laboratory fragmentation experiments.

    • T. Dürig
    • , J. D. L. White
    • , A. P. Murch
    • , B. Zimanowski
    • , R. Büttner
    • , D. Mele
    • , P. Dellino
    • , R. J. Carey
    • , L. S. Schmidt
    •  & N. Spitznagel
  • Article |

    Major sediment-hosted base metal deposits are located within 200 km of the border between thick and thin lithosphere, according to statistical comparisons between global lithospheric thickness and known deposit locations.

    • Mark J. Hoggard
    • , Karol Czarnota
    • , Fred D. Richards
    • , David L. Huston
    • , A. Lynton Jaques
    •  & Sia Ghelichkhan
  • Article |

    Earth’s deep-mantle domains are geochemically distinct. The African domain is enriched in subducted material, which suggests a different history from the Pacific domain and a dynamic relationship between plate tectonics and deep-mantle structures.

    • Luc S. Doucet
    • , Zheng-Xiang Li
    • , Hamed Gamal El Dien
    • , Amaury Pourteau
    • , J. Brendan Murphy
    • , William J. Collins
    • , Nadine Mattielli
    • , Hugo K. H. Olierook
    • , Christopher J. Spencer
    •  & Ross N. Mitchell
  • Article |

    Pluto’s subsurface ocean may have formed early due to accretionary heating, a comparison of thermal evolution modelling with observed tectonic structures suggests.

    • Carver J. Bierson
    • , Francis Nimmo
    •  & S. Alan Stern
  • News & Views |

    Large-scale land acquisitions accelerate tropical deforestation, suggests an analysis of two decades of land-deal and forest-cover data. Such exploitation will threaten the future of these globally crucial carbon sinks and biodiversity hotspots.

    • Andreas Neef
  • Article |

    Increased Southern Ocean productivity driven by sea-ice feedbacks contributed to a slowdown in rising CO2 levels during the last deglaciation, according to analyses of marine-derived aerosols from an Antarctic ice core.

    • C. J. Fogwill
    • , C. S. M. Turney
    • , L. Menviel
    • , A. Baker
    • , M. E. Weber
    • , B. Ellis
    • , Z. A. Thomas
    • , N. R. Golledge
    • , D. Etheridge
    • , M. Rubino
    • , D. P. Thornton
    • , T. D. van Ommen
    • , A. D. Moy
    • , M. A. J. Curran
    • , S. Davies
    • , M. I. Bird
    • , N. C. Munksgaard
    • , C. M. Rootes
    • , H. Millman
    • , J. Vohra
    • , A. Rivera
    • , A. Mackintosh
    • , J. Pike
    • , I. R. Hall
    • , E. A. Bagshaw
    • , E. Rainsley
    • , C. Bronk-Ramsey
    • , M. Montenari
    • , A. G. Cage
    • , M. R. P. Harris
    • , R. Jones
    • , A. Power
    • , J. Love
    • , J. Young
    • , L. S. Weyrich
    •  & A. Cooper
  • Article |

    Tropical deforestation rates are linked to large-scale land investments, according to georeferenced land deal records and remote sensing of forest loss over the past two decades.

    • Kyle Frankel Davis
    • , Heejin Irene Koo
    • , Jampel Dell’Angelo
    • , Paolo D’Odorico
    • , Lyndon Estes
    • , Laura J. Kehoe
    • , Milad Kharratzadeh
    • , Tobias Kuemmerle
    • , Domingos Machava
    • , Aurélio de Jesus Rodrigues Pais
    • , Natasha Ribeiro
    • , Maria Cristina Rulli
    •  & Mokganedi Tatlhego
  • Editorial |

    As the COVID-19 pandemic halts many research cruise activities, exploration of the oceans by autonomous vehicles continues, highlighting the strengths of robotic research, but also the limitations.

  • Article |

    Aerosol particles produced by biomass burning are ubiquitous in the remote troposphere, according to global airborne measurements over remote ocean regions.

    • G. P. Schill
    • , K. D. Froyd
    • , H. Bian
    • , A. Kupc
    • , C. Williamson
    • , C. A. Brock
    • , E. Ray
    • , R. S. Hornbrook
    • , A. J. Hills
    • , E. C. Apel
    • , M. Chin
    • , P. R. Colarco
    •  & D. M. Murphy
  • Article |

    Calcium carbonate formed in seagrass beds that is transported and dissolved in deeper waters offshore helps buffer coastal acidification in the Chesapeake Bay, according to geochemical modelling of a transect of carbonate chemistry measurements.

    • Jianzhong Su
    • , Wei-Jun Cai
    • , Jean Brodeur
    • , Baoshan Chen
    • , Najid Hussain
    • , Yichen Yao
    • , Chaoying Ni
    • , Jeremy M. Testa
    • , Ming Li
    • , Xiaohui Xie
    • , Wenfei Ni
    • , K. Michael Scaboo
    • , Yuan-yuan Xu
    • , Jeffrey Cornwell
    • , Cassie Gurbisz
    • , Michael S. Owens
    • , George G. Waldbusser
    • , Minhan Dai
    •  & W. Michael Kemp
  • Article |

    An artificial intelligence-based method may infill gaps in historical temperature data more effectively than conventional techniques. Application of this method reveals a stronger global warming trend between 1850 and 2018 than estimated previously.

    • Christopher Kadow
    • , David Matthew Hall
    •  & Uwe Ulbrich
  • Article |

    Long-term Himalayan erosion rates remained stable through the global climatic changes of the past six million years, according to the cosmogenic nuclide composition of terrestrial sediments recovered from the Bay of Bengal.

    • Sebastien J. P. Lenard
    • , Jérôme Lavé
    • , Christian France-Lanord
    • , Georges Aumaître
    • , Didier L. Bourlès
    •  & Karim Keddadouche
  • Article |

    Experimental mudflows under Martian surface conditions propagate similarly to terrestrial pahoehoe lava flows, suggesting mud (rather than igneous) volcanism can explain some flow morphologies on Mars.

    • Petr Brož
    • , Ondřej Krýza
    • , Lionel Wilson
    • , Susan J. Conway
    • , Ernst Hauber
    • , Adriano Mazzini
    • , Jan Raack
    • , Matthew R. Balme
    • , Matthew E. Sylvest
    •  & Manish R. Patel
  • Article |

    The Earth’s core may host most of the planet’s water inventory, according to calculations of the partitioning behaviour of water at conditions of core formation.

    • Yunguo Li
    • , Lidunka Vočadlo
    • , Tao Sun
    •  & John P. Brodholt
  • Editorial |

    The ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic highlights the very human effort that is peer review. We will continue to do all we can to keep the papers flowing and thank our reviewers and authors for their help and understanding under these difficult circumstances.

  • Article |

    Continued deoxygenation of the oceans will probably lead to enhanced demand for iron, as implied by the abundance of an iron-rich enzyme in the mesopelagic waters of the Pacific.

    • Mak A. Saito
    • , Matthew R. McIlvin
    • , Dawn M. Moran
    • , Alyson E. Santoro
    • , Chris L. Dupont
    • , Patrick A. Rafter
    • , Jaclyn K. Saunders
    • , Drishti Kaul
    • , Carl H. Lamborg
    • , Marian Westley
    • , Frederica Valois
    •  & John B. Waterbury
  • News & Views |

    The morphology and geometry of the plate interface in a subduction zone is heterogeneous and influenced by lower-plate normal faulting, suggests an analysis of seismic data. These properties of subduction interfaces may influence how the largest earthquakes occur.

    • Matt J. Ikari
  • News & Views |

    A revised age reconstruction suggests marine-based regions of the Eurasian Ice Sheet melted rapidly, contributing to a major sea-level rise some 14,600 years ago. Such a rapid collapse of massive ice hints at the vulnerability of Earth’s remaining ice sheets.

    • Joseph D. Ortiz
  • Article |

    Marine-based sections of the Eurasian Ice Sheet collapsed rapidly during a warming event 14,600 years ago and contributed to the Meltwater Pulse 1A event, according to a recalibrated age model for sediments from the Norwegian Sea.

    • Jo Brendryen
    • , Haflidi Haflidason
    • , Yusuke Yokoyama
    • , Kristian Agasøster Haaga
    •  & Bjarte Hannisdal
  • Article |

    Geometric and rheological complexities may control the mechanical behaviour of megathrusts, according to an analysis of the heterogeneity in roughness and rock properties of the Middle America megathrust from 3D seismic reflection data.

    • James D. Kirkpatrick
    • , Joel H. Edwards
    • , Alessandro Verdecchia
    • , Jared W. Kluesner
    • , Rebecca M. Harrington
    •  & Eli A. Silver
  • Article |

    Mineralization of platinum-group elements in mafic intrusions occurs due to repeated self-intrusion of magma, according to strontium isotope heterogeneities preserved in the Rum layered intrusion, Scotland.

    • Luke N. Hepworth
    • , J. Stephen Daly
    • , Ralf Gertisser
    • , Chris G. Johnson
    • , C. Henry Emeleus
    •  & Brian O’Driscoll
  • News & Views |

    Whether Earth’s water was delivered early or late in its formation is debated. The composition of Venus’s atmosphere may indicate that late accretion, the final stage of planet formation, delivered little water to the terrestrial planets.

    • Ramon Brasser
  • Article |

    The interface between riverbed and aquifer is a biogeochemical reaction hotspot for arsenic release from river sediments, according to numerical simulations of groundwater flow and biogeochemical reaction processes.

    • Ilka Wallis
    • , Henning Prommer
    • , Michael Berg
    • , Adam J. Siade
    • , Jing Sun
    •  & Rolf Kipfer
  • Article |

    Venus’s atmospheric composition suggests limited water delivery to the terrestrial planets by late accretion, according to numerical simulations of the interior and atmospheric evolution of Venus under various late accretion scenarios.

    • C. Gillmann
    • , G. J. Golabek
    • , S. N. Raymond
    • , M. Schönbächler
    • , P. J. Tackley
    • , V. Dehant
    •  & V. Debaille
  • Article |

    Iron isotopic fractionation at the core–mantle boundary due to thermal diffusion may partly explain the iron isotope composition of the upper mantle, according to high-temperature experiments and numerical simulations.

    • Charles E. Lesher
    • , Juliane Dannberg
    • , Gry H. Barfod
    • , Neil R. Bennett
    • , Justin J. G. Glessner
    • , Daniel J. Lacks
    •  & James M. Brenan
  • Editorial |

    Social distancing in response to COVID-19 need not mean social or scientific isolation. Adaption to technology now could lead to more innovative, sustainable and inclusive communication in the future.

  • Article |

    Mars’s mantle is chemically heterogeneous and contains multiple primordial water reservoirs, according to an analysis of the hydrogen isotopic composition of minerals in Martian meteorites.

    • Jessica J. Barnes
    • , Francis M. McCubbin
    • , Alison R. Santos
    • , James M. D. Day
    • , Jeremy W. Boyce
    • , Susanne P. Schwenzer
    • , Ulrich Ott
    • , Ian A. Franchi
    • , Scott Messenger
    • , Mahesh Anand
    •  & Carl B. Agee
  • Article |

    The oceans probably remained well-oxygenated for millions of years after the Palaeoproterozoic Lomagundi–Jatuli Event, according to high concentrations and isotope signatures of redox-sensitive metals in the 2-billion-year-old Zaonega Formation, Russia.

    • Kaarel Mänd
    • , Stefan V. Lalonde
    • , Leslie J. Robbins
    • , Marie Thoby
    • , Kärt Paiste
    • , Timmu Kreitsmann
    • , Päärn Paiste
    • , Christopher T. Reinhard
    • , Alexandr E. Romashkin
    • , Noah J. Planavsky
    • , Kalle Kirsimäe
    • , Aivo Lepland
    •  & Kurt O. Konhauser